Fight the Flu

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Fight the Flu

This year’s flu vaccine could be the most important one you ever get!

Each year, we talk about the importance of the flu shot . For 2020, it’s even more critical because it is possible to get both the flu and COVID-19.  COVID-19 can be a dangerous virus. COVID-19 coupled with influenza can compound problems—increased doctors’ visits, possible hospitalizations and even death, Prevention and safety are very important this year.

The flu shot can:

  • Save your life. Last year, more than 35 million people in the United States got sick with the flu, more than 490,000 were hospitalized and more than 34,000 died from the flu
  • Reduce your risk of getting sick with flu and needing hospitalization.
  • Reduce your risk of more serious illness and complications if you also get COVID-19

Need a Flu Shot? Got the Flu?

How to prevent flu and protect your loved ones

  • flu vaccine/flu shot
  • physical distancing 
  • washing hands
  • wearing masks

Flu Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is it the flu or is it COVID or is it a cold?

Is it the flu or is it COVID or is it a cold?
Flu symptoms, covid symptoms, asthma symptoms, common cold symptoms, allergies
Is it the flu or is it COVID or is it a cold?

What is the Flu?

What is the Flu?
What is the Flu?
  • Flu is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year, usually between October and May.
  • Anyone can get the flu, but it is more dangerous for some people. Infants and young children, people 65 years of age and older, pregnant women, and people with certain health conditions or a weakened immune system are at greatest risk of flu complications.
  • Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications.
  • If you have a medical condition, such as heart disease, cancer or diabetes, flu can make it worse.
  • Flu can cause fever and chills, sore throat, muscle aches, fatigue, cough, headache, and runny or stuffy nose. Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

This information comes from the CDC and you can learn more at www.cdc.gov/flu.

Who should get a Flu Shot?

Who should get a Flu Shot?
Who should get a Flu Shot?
  • CDC recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get vaccinated every flu season.
  • Children 6 months through 8 years of age may need 2 doses during a single flu season. Everyone else needs only 1 dose each flu season.
  • Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:
     - Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of influenza vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
    - Has ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (also called GBS).
  • In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone influenza vaccination to a future visit.
  • People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated.
  • People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting influenza vaccine.
  • Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information comes from the CDC and you can learn more at www.cdc.gov/flu.

How does the flu spread and how do we stop it?

How does the flu spread and how do we stop it?
How does the flu spread and how do we stop it?

People that have the flu virus can spread it by coughing or sneezing.  The flu virus also can be spread by touching your mouth or nose after touching something with the virus on it, such as a doorknob, table, shopping cart or hand.

How Long Can A Person With The Flu Spread The Virus To Other People?

 Typically, the flu can be spread from one day before a person shows symptoms of the flu to seven days after symptoms begin.

What Can I Do To Prevent The Spread Of The Flu Virus?

The Centers for Disease Control recommends the following actions to help prevent the spread of the flu virus:

  • Get the flu shot.
  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based hand rub.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • If you are sick, stay home for at least 24 hours after your symptoms are gone.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your arm when coughing or sneezing.